Schedule and Location

Welcome to the Sarasota Writers Group Blog. Meetings are held the first and third Wednesday of the month at the Nokomis Fire Station, located just a few blocks south of Albee Road (where Matthews-Currie Ford is located) at Pavonia Road. We are on the west, or bay side, of U.S. 41, by the Fire Station's flashing yellow caution traffic light. If you are coming from the south on US 41, we are just north of Dona Bay. Turn on Pavonia and pull to the far end, or west side, of the firehall. Please do not block the fire doors! We meet in the training room on the far side of the complex. Gathering time: 6:00 pm Meeting called to order: 6:30 pm Ten minute break: 7:50 pm Meeting Finishes at 9:00 pm

Monday, February 20, 2017

Good Stuff from Lesley Payne

The following was given to me by Darienne Oaks. It was written by Lesley Payne and contains wonderful advice for writers:

Chapters have beginnings, middles, and ends. The kicker is that it is good to end a chapter at a point of tension, with a hook, that pulls the reader forward. The beginning of the next chapter may be the resolution of something left hanging at the end of the last, proceeds through to near resolution, or to resolution with a new question raised, leaving again, a trigger that pushes the reader forward.

If you tie everything together at the end of a chapter, it leaves the reader a very handy excuse to set the book aside for a while, or forever. Compelling writing keeps the reader going. It makes a book the reader "can't put down." It makes for success. Try ending a chapter mid-scene, at a moment of crisis, with a question. However you do it, hook the reader to keep on reading.

This is, of course, most important in genres that rely the most heavily on suspense and tension, books that readers read to be held at the edge of their chairs–thrillers, action adventure, suspense. But even in romances, if you end a chapter with a strong feeling or image, a hope, a fear, a question, you can create the forward tug. Not every chapter has to end with a life-threatening cliff hanger, but strive for some sort of cliff hanger in the reader's mind–curiosity, hope, anticipation, fear.

While the specific ingredients–the pacing, the depth, the degree of emphasis on "suspense"–vary from genre to genre, the writer always aims to keep the reader hooked and reading. Look at books that have been successful in your genre and see how the chapter are structured, how hooks, or imminent danger, or just unanswered questions in the reader's mind, pull the reader onward. Ask yourself why you keep turning the pages. Or, if the book fails for you, why is it easy to stop turning, to set the book aside. Look to other successful writers for you cues here.


Create a question in the reader's mind. Don't volunteer information the reader is not curious about. Don't leave the reader feeling everything is resolved or concluded at chapter's end. Maintain tension and narrative drive. Allow the reader to participate by exercising her or his curiosity, analysis, feelings of anxiety, concern, terror, or poignancy.

Keep on writing...

Rod

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